This is just my opinion, but I think it’s a bit like marmite.  You either love it or you hate it. And if I’m being honest, I’m not a fan. But I do understand how people love it. It’s free, you can do it whenever and wherever you want, it’s getting outside with nature, it’s exhilarating….the list goes on. But I find it boring……moving in the same plane of motion all the time without a specific destination is just not for me. And that’s coming from experience because I did try it. But let me tell you about my recent experiences with runners since opening the Fit Shack.

Situation 1

I saw someone I know out running and caught up with them later in the day.

Me: did you enjoy your run?

Them: No. I hate running.

Me: Why do you run then?

Them: To lose weight

AARRRGGHHH!! There is so much wrong with that statement on so may levels.

  1. What you put in your mouth will determine around 70% of how much weight you lose.
  2. Exercise will speed this process up if done in the right way. Aerobic endurance training, particularly running, will typically produce a higher cortisol response (this is a stress hormone). In the long term, excessive cortisol will encourage fat storage and increase your appetite.
  3. Shorts bursts of high intensity interval training will be far more effective for weight loss than steady state running. You could incorporate this into your running?
  4. If you are choosing exercise to help with your weight loss, at least choose something that you LIKE so that you will stick to your exercise plan and enjoy it!!
  5. Group exercise classes can be a great way to help you to stick to a plan and motivate you to continue.

Situation 2

A client (runner) comes to a strength training class for the first time. I noticed, at the end of the class, that the client had extremely tight hamstrings and suggested going to see an osteopath to check for pelvic alignment. The client was advised to strengthen the leg/glute muscles BUT only once the core was strong enough to handle the weights, and was told to go to Pilates. I see this regularly in lots of runners. If you love running, and want to continue to run for as long as possible injury free, core exercises are vitally important.

  1. Core workouts help you stay healthy and prevent injury. Core strength plays a vital role in stabilising your entire body during running by maintaining a neutral pelvis, and delaying the breakdown in your form when you’re fatigued.
  2. Strength exercises improve your running economy. Stronger muscles, particularly in the legs, help you run faster and use less energy at the same time.
  3. Core workouts can help you race faster. If you combine these 2 powerful benefits together (core & strength) and work on your core strength exercises, what happens when you combine injury prevention with higher efficiency? You become a faster runner!

It is important to note that your ‘core’ is more than just your abdominal muscles. The core includes hamstrings, quads, hips, glutes, hip flexors, obliques and lower back.

So if the only form of exercise you’re getting is running, you’re missing out on a variety of benefits that could actually help your running. Strength and core exercises are the perfect compliment to your running. They optimise your running so you can keep going without injuries, and even race faster.

Situation 3

Mel Ingle, a client, told me about her experiences with her running since she started coming to classes and wants to share them with you:

“I am probably typical of a whole swath of 30 something parents with busy lives trying to lose the weight gain of two pregnancies in the most time and cost efficient way possible. I turned to running and my three times weekly 5-6km runs were my sole fitness activities until I started weight and calesthenics training approx. 18 months ago. Having never thought that weight training was ‘worth it’ as I felt the optimum route to weight loss and body fitness was through pure cardio (plus diet management), I have had to eat my words 100% as I have seen my strength improve, my muscle tone develop AND my running improve. The first was hill running. The added leg strength from the constant squats, lunges and planks during weight training sessions meant I hit PBs up hills like never before as my strong legs and core carried me effortlessly. Eventually my additional strength has helped everything from distance to time and I hit my 23 minute 5km running Personal Best at the height of my weight training, the same week as I perfected a free-standing headstand and planked for 5 minutes straight. I now train with hand weights, bar weights or my own body weight through calesthenics 3 x per week and run twice. I am fitter, stronger and I know that as I age and approach the perimenopause I am helping support my body through the challenges ahead.“

 

So come on runners, why not improve your running with our strength classes? I challenge you.

Click the link to book: https://fit-shack.com/group-exercise-classes/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.Required fields are marked *